Tim Ryan drops out of 2020 presidential race

Rep. Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) RyanMinnesota AG Keith Ellison says racism is a bigger problem than police behavior; 21 states see uptick in cases amid efforts to reopen Congress must fill the leadership void Pelosi pushes to unite party on coronavirus bill despite grumbling from left MORE (D-Ohio) on Thursday announced he will exit the 2020 presidential race, ending a long-shot bid that failed to gain traction amid a crowded field of high-profile candidates.

“I got into this race in April to really give voice to the forgotten people of our country. I look forward to continuing that fight. Thank you, to everyone who supported this campaign,” Ryan said in a video posted to his Twitter account.

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In the video, titled “Giving Voice to the Forgotten,” Ryan said “I’ll be returning home to my family and friends and community in Ohio to run for reelection for my congressional seat.” The filing deadline for primary candidates in Ohio is Dec. 16.

Ryan is the third sitting representative to drop out of the race, following Reps. Eric SwalwellEric Michael SwalwellNASCAR bans display of Confederate flag from events and properties Gloves come off as Democrats fight for House seat in California Grenell says intelligence community working to declassify Flynn-Kislyak transcripts MORE (D-Calif.) and Seth MoultonSeth MoultonEx-CBO director calls for more than trillion in coronavirus stimulus spending Overnight Defense: Trump’s move to use military in US sparks backlash | Defense officials take heat | Air Force head calls Floyd’s death ‘a national tragedy’ Democrats blast Trump’s use of military against protests MORE (D-Mass.). The only remaining sitting House member in the crowded field is Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardGabbard drops defamation lawsuit against Clinton It’s as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process 125 lawmakers urge Trump administration to support National Guard troops amid pandemic MORE (D-Hawaii).

Ryan, a nine-term congressman, announced his presidential campaign in April, positioning himself as a moderate voice equipped to speak to concerns by working-class voters in regions of the country that voted for President TrumpDonald John TrumpSenate advances public lands bill in late-night vote Warren, Democrats urge Trump to back down from veto threat over changing Confederate-named bases Esper orders ‘After Action Review’ of National Guard’s role in protests MORE after twice supporting former President Obama.

“I wanted to give voice to the forgotten communities that have been left behind by globalization and automation. And I’m proud of this campaign, because I believe we’ve done that,” Ryan said in the campaign video. “We’ve given voice to the forgotten communities and the forgotten people in the United States.”

He failed to gain much support, however, with his campaign reporting he raised $425,731 between July and September, far behind both the rest of the field and the $895,000 he raised in the second quarter of 2019. The RealClearPolitics polling average indicated his support in the primaries hovering around 0.6 percent.

Ryan qualified for the first two Democratic presidential debates in June and July but he failed to qualify beyond that. Ryan has not yet made a decision on an endorsement, according to his campaign.

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