Yang highlights outsider status in Iowa ad ahead of caucuses

Entrepreneur Andrew YangAndrew YangGeorge Floyd protests show corporations must support racial and economic equality Andrew Yang discusses his universal basic income pilot program Andrew Yang on the George Floyd protests in Minneapolis MORE is touting his status as a political outsider in a new Iowa ad as the Democratic presidential hopeful seeks to gin up support for his White House bid less than two weeks ahead of the Hawkeye State’s caucuses.

In the ad, which is the product of a $500,000 media buy and will start airing across Iowa on Wednesday, Yang argues that an outsider is uniquely suited to defeat President TrumpDonald John TrumpSenate advances public lands bill in late-night vote Warren, Democrats urge Trump to back down from veto threat over changing Confederate-named bases Esper orders ‘After Action Review’ of National Guard’s role in protests MORE.

“I’m the only candidate to build a nonprofit that created thousands of jobs in places from St. Louis to Baltimore,” he said. “More than any other candidate, I know how to build a 21st century economy that rewrites the rules so they work for you.”

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“The hard truth is we won’t beat Donald Trump with what’s coming out of Washington today — old ideas and angry rhetoric. Donald Trump is a symptom of a broken system. To defeat him, we need someone with experience tackling the economic challenges of our time. I’ve done that,” he added.

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Yang, who launched the nonprofit Venture for America in 2011, went on to promise he would create millions of jobs and ensure all Americans have access to health care.

The entrepreneur has often touted his outsider status on the campaign trail, underlining his past as a businessman while focusing much of his campaign on creating a plan for universal basic income and policies intended to combat the impacts of automation on blue-collar workers. 

While Yang has enjoyed an unexpected staying power in the primary race, outlasting multiple senators and governors who had heftier campaign bank accounts and wider name recognition, the RealClearPolitics average of polling in Iowa shows him a distant sixth behind former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenHillicon Valley: Biden calls on Facebook to change political speech rules | Dems demand hearings after Georgia election chaos | Microsoft stops selling facial recognition tech to police Trump finalizing executive order calling on police to use ‘force with compassion’ The Hill’s Campaign Report: Biden campaign goes on offensive against Facebook MORE, Sens. Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Hill’s 12:30 Report: Milley apologizes for church photo-op Harris grapples with defund the police movement amid veep talk Biden courts younger voters — who have been a weakness MORE (I-Vt.), Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenWarren, Democrats urge Trump to back down from veto threat over changing Confederate-named bases OVERNIGHT DEFENSE: Joint Chiefs chairman says he regrets participating in Trump photo-op | GOP senators back Joint Chiefs chairman who voiced regret over Trump photo-op | Senate panel approves 0B defense policy bill Trump on collision course with Congress over bases with Confederate names MORE (D-Mass.) and Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharHillicon Valley: Biden calls on Facebook to change political speech rules | Dems demand hearings after Georgia election chaos | Microsoft stops selling facial recognition tech to police Democrats demand Republican leaders examine election challenges after Georgia voting chaos Harris grapples with defund the police movement amid veep talk MORE (D-Minn.), and former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegScaled-back Pride Month poses challenges for fundraising, outreach Biden hopes to pick VP by Aug. 1 It’s as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process MORE.

Iowa’s first-in-the-nation caucuses, which this year fall on Feb. 3, have a history of culling the primary field and curtailing momentum for candidates who place outside the top tier. However, Yang has racked up millions in cash on hand to help sustain his run and has shown no signals he intends to drop out of the race should he fall outside the top five.

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